Andy Graham Has Writer's Block

I am trying to finish a book, finally I must admit to writers block, how to explain one facet of the book has me confused, I feel blocked.

I am lying here in my bed typing away, fully aware there is something in the back of my mind blocking me from finishing my first book.

August 28, 2011 - Panajachel, Guatemala, on Lago Atitlan

Writing a Blog post is easy, the beginning middle and end are all encapsulated in a few paragraphs. While writing a book is a long series of chapters, they must all work in harmony, there is a need for consistency and congruency.

The Problem: This endeaver going to explain seasoned traveler, and the plan wat to champion their choices of places to live. Well, upon analysis of the Pro travelers, I realize many of them are radically different than my target audience. To explain them in great detail could alienate readers from my main goal, to explain how a retired person, or anyone with from 500 - 5000 USD per month can live a dream live.

The Solution: I am going to write only one paragraph about each person highlighting their strengths, and not allow them to explain in their own words which often go too far off topic. My initial plan was to allow each to write their own story, this is not going to work, I need to keep the boom on one topic, and not allow each pro or seasoned traveler to lead readers in any direction they want, I must do the interpetation and explain.

This problem has slowed me down to a stop, I now feel I am able to continue, however there will be less about the profiles of seasoned or pro traveler, and more about how to retire and choose the optimal locations abroad.

Writer's block Defined from Wikipedia: Writer's block is a condition, primarily associated with writing as a profession, in which an author loses the ability to produce new work. The condition varies widely in intensity. It can be trivial, a temporary difficulty in dealing with the task at hand. At the other extreme, some "blocked" writers have been unable to work for years on end, and some have even abandoned their careers. It can manifest as the affected writer viewing their work as inferior or unsuitable, when in fact it could be the opposite.

Causes of writer's blockWriter's block may have many or several causes. Some are essentially creative problems that originate within an author's work itself. A writer may run out of inspiration. The writer may be greatly distracted and feel he or she may have something that needs to be done beforehand. A project may be fundamentally misconceived, or beyond the author's experience or ability. A fictional example can be found in George Orwell's novel Keep The Aspidistra Flying, in which the protagonist Gordon Comstock struggles in vain to complete an epic poem describing a day in London: "It was too big for him, that was the truth. It had never really progressed, it had simply fallen apart into a series of fragments."

Other blocks, especially the more serious kind, may be produced by adverse circumstances in a writer's life or career: physical illness, depression, the end of a relationship, financial pressures, a sense of failure. The pressure to produce work may in itself contribute to a writer's block, especially if they are compelled to work in ways that are against their natural inclination, i.e. too fast or in some unsuitable style or genre. In some cases, writer's block may also come from feeling intimidated by a previous big success, the creator putting on themselves a paralyzing pressure to find something to equate that same success again. The writer Elizabeth Gilbert, reflecting on her post-bestseller prospects, proposes that such a pressure might be released by interpreting creative writers as "having" genius rather than "being" a genius. In George Gissing's New Grub Street, one of the first novels to take writer's block as a main theme, the novelist Edwin Reardon becomes completely unable to write and is shown as suffering from all those problems.  


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