Czech Republic Visa Or Entry Stamp - Tips

Czech Republic Visa or Entry Stamp

Czech Republic Consular Information Sheet May 31, 2007 COUNTRY DESCRIPTION: The Czech Republic is located in the heart of Europe. Tourist facilities in Prague are at the level of those found in most European capitals, while travelers can expect lower standards outside of Prague. Travelers are encouraged to be vigilant as pick-pocketing and petty theft occurs often in crowded tourist areas, restaurants and on public transportation. More information can be found in the section on crime. Please read the Department of State Background Notes on the Czech Republic for additional information. ENTRY REQUIREMENTS: A passport is required and must be valid for 3 months beyond the intended stay. Visas are not required for U.S. citizens for tourist, short study or business visits of up to 90 days. Visas are required for longer stays and for any gainful activity. See our Foreign Entry Requirements brochure for more information on the Czech Republic and other countries. Visit the Embassy of the Czech Republic’s website at for the most current visa information. The Czech Government requires that proof of finances to pay for your stay and for you to have travel/health insurance and is requiring proof of medical insurance for travelers to the Czech Republic. Minimum coverage of the insurance has to be at least $35,000. According to the Czech Government, a health insurance card or an internationally recognized credit card with health insurance included will generally be accepted as proof of insurance to enter the Republic. The health insurance requirement does not apply to those who have visas permitting them to work. See Entry and Exit Requirements for more information pertaining to dual nationality and the prevention of international child abduction. Please refer to our Customs Information to learn more about customs regulations. SAFETY AND SECURITY: Civil disorder is rare in the Czech Republic, although strikes and demonstrations may occur. U.S. citizens should be vigilant in protecting their security, bearing in mind that even demonstrations meant to be peaceful may turn violent. Americans are advised to avoid street demonstrations. For the latest security information, Americans traveling abroad should regularly monitor the Department’s Internet web site, where the current Worldwide Caution Public Announcement, Travel Warnings and Public Announcements can be found. Up to date information on security can also be obtained by calling 1-888-407-4747 toll free in the U.S., or, for callers outside the U.S. and Canada, a regular toll line at 1-202-501-4444. These numbers are available from 8:00 a.m. to 8:00 p.m. Eastern Time, Monday through Friday (except U.S. federal holidays. The Department of State urges American citizens to take responsibility for their own personal security while traveling overseas. For general information about appropriate measures travelers can take to protect themselves in an overseas environment, see the Department of State’s pamphlet A Safe Trip Abroad. CRIME: The Czech Republic generally has a low rate of crime. However, street crime-particularly pick-pocketing and occasional mugging-is a problem, especially in major tourist areas in Prague. Travelers are encouraged to be especially vigilant in Prague’s restaurants, train stations, and on public transportation around the city center. Incidents of pick pocketing were reported in significant numbers during 2006. Incidents of violent crime, while still relatively infrequent, are becoming more common in Prague. Travelers should be aware of the reported use of rohypnol, and other “date rape” drugs in the Czech Republic. Caution should be used when accepting open drinks at bars or clubs. Travelers should be very careful while riding trains, trams or metro, where most crime occurs. Travelers should keep a copy of their passport in a safe place separate from the passport itself; this copy can help you to apply for a new passport if yours is lost or stolen. Visitors should be alert to the potential for substantial overcharging by taxis, particularly in areas frequented by tourists. Radio-dispatched taxis are often much more reliable. It is also advisable to set the price in advance. INFORMATION FOR VICTIMS OF CRIME: The loss or theft abroad of a U.S. passport should be reported immediately to the local police and the nearest U.S. Embassy or Consulate. If you are the victim of a crime while overseas, in addition to reporting to local police, please contact the nearest U.S. Embassy or Consulate for assistance. The Embassy or Consulate staff can, for example, assist you to find appropriate medical care, to contact family members or friends and explain how funds could be transferred. Although the investigation and prosecution of the crime is solely the responsibility of local authorities, consular officers can help you to understand the local criminal justice process and to find an attorney if needed. See our information for Victim’s of Crime. MEDICAL FACILITIES AND HEALTH INFORMATION: Prague has good Western-style medical clinics with English-speaking doctors and dentists. However, staff members at the majority of Czech medical facilities do not speak English. Doctors and hospitals often expect cash payment for health services, though some facilities do accept credit cards. Hospitalization in the Czech Republic is much more liberal that in the United States; conditions that would be treated on an outpatient basis in the United States are often treated on an inpatient basis in the Czech Republic. Ambulance services are not on a par with U.S. standards. Response time can sometimes be slow, and different ambulances are dispatched depending on the perceived severity of the patient’s condition. Many ambulance companies expect payment at the time of delivery. Serious medical problems requiring hospitalization and/or medical evacuation to the United States can cost thousands of dollars or more. Please note that because euthanasia is not permitted under Czech law, U.S. living wills providing for no exceptional interventions to prolong life cannot be honored in the Czech Republic. People traveling from April through October who plan to participate in camping or hiking in long grass or woodlands run the risk of both tick-borne encephalitis and Lyme disease. All travelers should take precautions to prevent tick bites. There is a vaccine for the former, but not for Lyme disease. Information on vaccinations and other health precautions, such as safe food and water precautions and insect bite protection, may be obtained from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention’s hotline for international travelers at 1-877-FYI-TRTP (1-877-394-8747) or via the CDC’s Internet site at For information about outbreaks of infectious diseases abroad consult the World Health Organization’s (WHO) website at Further health information for travelers is available at MEDICAL INSURANCE: The Department of State strongly urges Americans to consult with their medical insurance company prior to traveling abroad to confirm whether their policy applies overseas and whether it will cover emergency expenses such as a medical evacuation. Please see our information on medical insurance overseas TRAFFIC SAFETY AND ROAD CONDITIONS: While in a foreign country, U.S. citizens may encounter road conditions that differ significantly from those in the United States. The information below concerning the Czech Republic is provided for general reference only, and may not be totally accurate in a particular location or circumstance. Travelers should note that road fatalities are occurring at an increasing rate in the Czech Republic, placing it amongst the most lethal places to drive in Europe. First-class roads in the Czech Republic generally meet European standards. However, on side roads, drivers should be prepared to encounter uneven surfaces, irregular lane markings and sign placements that are not clear. Streets in towns are not always in good condition. U.S. drivers should pay special attention to driving on cobblestone and among streetcars in historic city centers. Traffic lights are placed before the intersection and not after as in the United States. Speed limits are 50 km/h in towns, 90 km/h outside of towns and 130 km/h on highways. An International Driving Permit (IDP), available from AAA (in the United States only), must accompany a U.S. driver’s license; failure to have the IDP with a valid license may result in denial of an insurance claim after an accident. Persons driving into the Czech Republic should be aware that a road usage tax sticker is required to drive legally on major highways. Signs stating this requirement are posted near the border, but they are easy to miss. The stickers are available at gasoline stations. The fine for failing to display a motorways toll sticker is assessed on the spot. For specific information concerning Czech requirements for driver’s permits, vehicle inspection, road tax and mandatory insurance, please contact the Czech Tourist Authority offices in New York by telephone at (212)288-0830 or via email at Visit the websites of the Czech Republic’s national tourist office and national authority responsible for road safety at and . Please refer to our Road Safety page for information. AVIATION SAFETY OVERSIGHT: The U.S. Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) has assessed the Government of Czech Republic’s Civil Aviation Authority as being in compliance with International Civil Aviation Organization international aviation safety standards for oversight of the Czech Republic’s air carrier operations. For more information, travelers may visit the FAA’s Internet web site at SPECIAL CIRCUMSTANCES: Czech customs authorities enforce strict regulations concerning temporary importation into or export from the Czech Republic of items such as firearms, antiquities, medications, business equipment, etc. It is advisable to contact the Embassy of the Czech Republic in Washington, D.C, or the Consulates General of the Czech Republic in New York and Los Angeles for specific information regarding customs requirements. Please see our information on Customs Regulations. CRIMINAL PENALTIES: While in a foreign country, a U.S. citizen is subject to that country's laws and regulations, which sometimes differ significantly from those in the United States and may not afford the protections available to the individual under U.S. law. Penalties for breaking the law can be more severe than in the United States for similar offenses. Persons violating Czech Republic laws, even unknowingly, may be expelled, arrested or imprisoned. Penalties for possession, use, or trafficking in illegal drugs in the Czech Republic are strict and convicted offenders can expect jail sentences and heavy fines. Engaging in sexual conduct with children or using or disseminating child pornography in a foreign country is a crime, prosecutable in the United States. Please see our information on Criminal Penalties. CHILDREN'S ISSUES: For information on international adoption of children and international parental child abduction, see the Office of Children’s Issues website. REGISTRATION/EMBASSY AND CONSULATE LOCATIONS: Americans living in the Czech Republic are encouraged to register with the U.S. Embassy through the State Department’s travel registration website, and to obtain updated information on travel and security within the Czech Republic. Americans without Internet access may register directly with the U.S. Embassy. By registering, American citizens make it easier for the Embassy to contact them in case of emergency. The U.S. Embassy in Prague is located at Trziste 15, 118 01 Prague, Czech Republic; telephone (420)257 530 663; for after-hours emergencies only, telephone (420 257 532 716; Consular Section’s fax (420) 257 534 028; webpage: * * * This replaces the Consular Information Sheet dated October 31, 2006, to update information in the Crime section.*********************************************************** See for State Department Travel Warnings ******************************************************************************** To change your subscription, go to Czech Republic Visa or Entry Stamp


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