American Culture Does Not Want to Listen to Global Views

Talking about my perpetual travels around the planet is a great way to lose friends.

Smiles

I have been home in the USA now for two weeks, and I have been asking myself the question,
"Can I live here in the USA?"

There are four ways for me to have a conversation with my American friends who have never traveled outside the USA.

1. I listen to the other person.

2. The other person listens to me.

3. We each share equally in talking about subjects, and me explain stories about my last 14 years, and include stories about what happened in any of the 90 countries I have lived.

4. We each share equally, but I never bring up my last 14 years of life.

If I want to lose friends here in the USA, all I have to do is talk about my world travels, it takes a very special person to allow me discuss the world.

I try my best to NEVER talk about my world travels, when I accidentally bring up a story, it always goes back, like begging to here an insulting comment. It is amazing how Americans think they number one on the planet, and every other country is poor, unhappy, and stupid.

I said to a friend,
"I have never heard of a person killing themselves in Africa, and the stupid Americans are so unhappy they can neither stayed married, and they are one step away from killing themselves."

Now, it is the same in other countries, I am not going to discuss my world travels in any country on the planet. At the end of the day, the more I know about the planet, the more isolated I become. 

Della Strada

That's the truth, Andy. I only discuss my travels if the person I am talking to is a traveler as well. My metric for determining travelers is less stringent than yours, since I'm still in university. If they've done at least a semester abroad, one or more independent trips and they are going abroad again sometime soon, they're a 'traveler.' At the very least, these types of people are more likely to relate to my stories and I am more likely to relate to them as well.

If they're NOT extremely interested in travel, as you know, after 5 seconds people will glaze over during a travel story. Or, they assume that you 1. don't like America, 2. are some kind of snob and the worst of all 3. that you're rich, because in order to travel you must be rich.

I'm rich by most country's standards, but not by American standards. I live off about $13,000 a year, including 6 months of travel and the thousand dollars worth of books the academic-exploitation industry requires me to buy. But people believe that just because you live your dreams, you must have some secret source of wealth. Yeah, I do, it's called not buying crap I don't need. It's time to get rid of this idea that only the wealthy have the time and money to chase their dreams.


Della Strada

That's the truth, Andy. I only discuss my travels if the person I am talking to is a traveler as well. My metric for determining travelers is less stringent than yours, since I'm still in university. If they've done at least a semester abroad, one or more independent trips and they are going abroad again sometime soon, they're a 'traveler.' At the very least, these types of people are more likely to relate to my stories and I am more likely to relate to them as well.

If they're NOT extremely interested in travel, as you know, after 5 seconds people will glaze over during a travel story. Or, they assume that you 1. don't like America, 2. are some kind of snob and the worst of all 3. that you're rich, because in order to travel you must be rich.

I'm rich by most country's standards, but not by American standards. I live off about $13,000 a year, including 6 months of travel and the thousand dollars worth of books the academic-exploitation industry requires me to buy. But people believe that just because you live your dreams, you must have some secret source of wealth. Yeah, I do, it's called not buying crap I don't need. It's time to get rid of this idea that only the wealthy have the time and money to chase their dreams.


Della Strada

That's the truth, Andy. I only discuss my travels if the person I am talking to is a traveler as well. My metric for determining travelers is less stringent than yours, since I'm still in university. If they've done at least a semester abroad, one or more independent trips and they are going abroad again sometime soon, they're a 'traveler.' At the very least, these types of people are more likely to relate to my stories and I am more likely to relate to them as well.

If they're NOT extremely interested in travel, as you know, after 5 seconds people will glaze over during a travel story. Or, they assume that you 1. don't like America, 2. are some kind of snob and the worst of all 3. that you're rich, because in order to travel you must be rich.

I'm rich by most country's standards, but not by American standards. I live off about $13,000 a year, including 6 months of travel and the thousand dollars worth of books the academic-exploitation industry requires me to buy. But people believe that just because you live your dreams, you must have some secret source of wealth. Yeah, I do, it's called not buying crap I don't need. It's time to get rid of this idea that only the wealthy have the time and money to chase their dreams.


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