Wagassi Togo Street Food

Wagassi Togo Street Food
Wagassi Wagashe Wagasee
Badou Togo West Africa
Thursday, May 3, 2007

One man wrote it down as Wagassi from the Kotokoli language, but what does he know, he only speaks the language.

Street Food of Badou, Togo West Africa

I have considered trying to think of guidelines and a tip on how to eat safely anywhere on the planet. I believe the safest way to eat food is packaged or processed foods, like crackers in a package and any food on a shelf in a container of some type, I now check the expiration dates, and I go in stores that are selling a lot of food, eggs make me nervous.

Then second is to cook the food yourself.
Third is Street Food
Fourth is a busy food stand.

I think the more expensive the restaurant maybe the more dangerous the food. Numbers, what I feel I need, I need numbers, I count the people, how many people are eating the food. Here in Togo if I go into an expensive Tourist fare restaurant, I am probably the only person in the restaurant. This make me extremely nervous, unless a busy Tourist Fare restaurant with lots of tourist.

Busy is good, slow is bad. More food tester, maybe we all die.

Now, when the food comes out from a Tourist Fare Restaurant, it looks good, and it may be good, but how do I know how long that chicken was there in the kitchen, and when they cooked it. They may have cooked the chicken five days ago, it could have been sitting in a basket, on a shelf, and now they think, we will sell it or we lose money, so let us heat it up and sell it. They are happy to sell the left-over food, because why would they lose money to be safe.

I have traveled for 10 years, I see this all the time, every day of the week, the food that was not sold yesterday, is served the next day. I took a photo of cooked chicken in Thailand at 7:00 in the morning, this is normal, not abnormal, and do would you trust a leader in Africa, and you trust the cook.

Street food, I like street food, I can see them make it, I cannot see goulash, or sauces, or complicated foods being made, but if I can see many people eating it, if the place is busy, I know, there is a good chance this food is fresh, because it will soon be gone.



This is a very happy and fun lady just as I clear the parking lot of the Cascades Plus Hotel here in Badou, Togo. She is selling as best I learn and surmise, cooked cheese.

One piece is 25 Franks and 10 would be 250 Francs or
50 Cents US. How much does cooked cheese cost in a restaurant in the USA?

I had an opportunity to eat this at a stop along the road when coming from Atakpame to Badou, however, I could not see them cooking it. Plus not much fun to watch all the locals squeezing the cheese as the reached from inside the van, then grabbing many pieces, squeeze food and put back on the plate, normal for them, touch the food, not normal of me. Why are you touching the food, have you no manners, oops, I am in Africa, this is about what maybe 147 down on the Human Development scale, they did not get that far down the list by being developed, they are under developed.



This is Wagassi, I would say there is maybe no correct way to spell and if there is, then so what. I trust the man today who offered to write the name down for me, then demanded a Cadeau for the service, I ended up giving him my pen, what a pain sometimes to talk with people, everything has a price on it.

I like this food, great to eat, the fat lady was fun, and the man who wrote the word down was ok, in a twisted, you have to love them sort of way.

He says the language is,
Kotokoli

Never heard of this, and not sure where it came from, not sure I care, it I cared about what I seen everyday, I would need to go home and relax after one day of travel. The world is endless, there is more than I can every learn, but great for a curious sort like me, and I do get hungry.

Food, Togo Food, Street Food, Togo,

Wagassi Wagashe Wagasee
Wagassi Togo Street Food

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