TO MARRAKECH

I will leave at 23:50 by train tonight for Marrakech, Morocco, this is more of a changes in latitude, do not want to buy a jacket move, than any type of tourist move. It is cold here, at about 35 degrees above the Equator. So if I go Marrakech I am at 31.5 degrees or close, and that is maybe enough to feel a better. I really need to get to about 23.5 or the Tropic of Cancer before I know I will be ok. I do need and attitude adjustment and the beach Is my cure, so when I arrive to Marrakech tomorrow I will instantly get on a bus to Essaouira. It is about 106 mile or 170 kilometer from Marrakech, so I anticipate I will arrive around two in the afternoon.



Tangiers is nice, but not very exciting, I believe during the summer you probably have a city full of crazy European travelers, but right now in November, it is dead. However, it does have a good French taste in my mouth, and I am hoping to take a big bite as I go to the beaches of Essaouira.



The Encyclopedia says Essaouira had about 50 thousand people in 1994 so that means I would guess up to 100,000 now, and hopefully has a small feel about it. Just hope it is not full on, no stop tourism, or as I would say,

“Sold to the tourist trade city.”



Nonetheless, it is warmer, and Frenchie warm. This place is probably a good place to come, learn French cheaply, and fun.



IBN BATTUTAH

This is the name of the Hotel across from the Muniria in Tanger, Morocco.



TOO MUCH WORK

I walked around and stood around for one hour on the main street above my Hotel trying to take photos of the Djellebas clothing.



I am still not clear and really do not want to know that much, but more or less find it interesting to learn about customs and clothing.



However, there are many types of long dress like covers for both men and women. Some have hoods and other do not, but then the women may on some occasions have their head in a scarf or another type of Islamic covering. Not often in this area of Tangiers, and I am sure it changes there is an occasional woman with an attached scarf like a belly dancer would have across here face. The normal girl has the long dress like clothing and maybe a scarf. The girl in the internet café has her head wrapped style and normal western type jeans or pants.



The fashion here is so varied that you cannot say that any one type of clothing is typical. There is a real bleeding of cultures where I am located because I am in the center of a commercial area and none of the normal society rule apply harshly where people do business. Societal rules are more for small villages and neighborhoods. I am not able to escape the city norms without taking a taxi away from the center and really cannot be bothered, plus this Tangiers is a border town so would still be questionable as to what is closer to the long-term types of Moroccan culture.



There was a working girl with normal Western clothes standing on the corner, so I slowed down. What happens then if she is a working girl they will say hello. So this one said something in French with was probably hello, but they tried about three languages the other day and I ignored them so I was 90 percent sure they were working girls.



When I encounter a beggar or working girl, I normally forget which language I talk, and just nod my head. I will not reply unless for some reason I am amused, because that is their goal to entrap you in a conversation. It is difficult thought when they are well mannered and speak English to remember and keep my mouth shut.



So this one says hello, I stop, and she wants to know.

Britannia or Espanol



Meaning in Arab way, English or Spanish,

I said,

“Espanol.”

She proceeds to mumble in Spanish and is very difficult to understand. I stand there with my camera in hand. I am trying to take photos and walking around with a camera in hand is like saying.

“Hey, come and rob me.”

However, it is very early, about 10:00 AM and strangely, these women are working in the morning and at night, they disappear.



Ok, then she finally says,

“Chica.”



Meaning girl in Spanish,

I say,

“Cuantes Cuesta?”

How much,

She says,

“No problema.”



Now I am positive at this juncture that she is a working girl, but keep going to make sure I understand, plus a couple of girl I want photos of are starting to come around.



I say,

How much again, she does not answer,

I repeat.



No problem in another language means a huge problem when you go to pay because the price will be out of the world, plus I am curious what the going rate in Tangiers is.

She says, I think,

“Treinte”

Or 30 dirham or however you spell the money here.



This is about 3 U.S. dollars at an estimating value of 10 Dirham to the dollar, so maybe this is correct, but I am still not sure.



I then say,

“Habitaciones?” or “Cuarto.”



Normally they ask about room.

So all these three girls say Soent or like So with ent on the end.

I think she is saying 7, and I am laughing that a room for 7 is cheap, but they could also mean setenta or 70. We go through some discussions and I am trying to maneuver into a good position for a quick photo, so I must keep up the conversation. Finally, the fat one comes into view and I change the subject to the Deejeblla. I have no idea how to say this, and ask in Spanish,

“Que tipo de ropa esta ese.?”

I point at the fat girl with my camera in hand.



More or less what type of clothing is she wearing and I raise the camera and

click;

they all go running and warn me,

“No photos.”

“Porque,”



As I appear to be the dumb American, very simple ploy and works on the whole world, as the world always assumes Americans are naïve, so we can do that Texas play stupid thing and learn what we want.



I finally figure out that she wants 100 or cent in French for the room, but I say cien, and I do not think they know the word for 100 in Spanish. So for sure the Spanish here is not good.



But I am not sure what she wanted, and I walked away, happy to have this photo, to say the least there is not much leading into temptation on this street.



Oh, yes, she told me 3 ways to say the word

Deejab or Dejebella or Dejeb or whatever type of clothing you call that thing with a hood. Spanish, French and Arabic or Moroccan language I believe she was explaining.



All this to research the type of clothing, now I suppose I could find some very good English speaking person and have them edit, change, put their best foot forward, and totally misrepresent this type of clothing, but to learn, I know I must push and much around.



I decided it was not a good idea to put the photo HERE.

Sorry, it came out dark anyway.



I went into a men’s clothing store and took this so I would not irritate people.







Djellebas from the back with the hood









Djellebas







Djellebas on old man.



Mission Accomplished.



WARNING

Note this interplay with the girls is dangerous, and should not be repeated. I am very serious about this, and I am very experienced with dealing with different cultures. Do not take photos of these types of girls or in these types of areas. It is just up the hill from my Hotel the Muniria and is on the way to the Internet Café, I have passed it for two day a few times, and have already cased the place for watchers and any type of heavy handed person.



The girl was curious about the USA and was willing to have some fun talking and knew I was pulling her leg, and not serious, but she could have been a big problem…



Note

http://www.usatoday.com/news/world/2004-11-02-filmmaker-killed_x.htm

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