Uganda Cattle Photos

Uganda Cattle Photos
I have a farm history; my family comes from a small town of 400 people in the Northeast part of the state of Indiana, USA. I worked on a farm for about eight summer of my life, and went to a High School called Prairie Heights, the FFA or Future Farmers of America was the main organization in the my School.

I am here in Uganda, Africa looking at cattle and asking myself questions about the Horns on cattle and realize, I do not know as much as I think.

Which breeds of cattle have horns?
What would a Holstein look like with horns?
Which breeds of cattle grow horns?

I am sure my friend Gary in Boston with a MBA making ungodly amounts of money can answer all these questions, however so far in the past he has had problems figuring out how to make comments. Maybe our new simplified comments section will allow the non-binary, non-techie Gary to comment and enter the fray.

Truly only about 10 percent of readers can figure out how to make comments with the or WordPress System, the systems are not user friendly… I have tried to get Gary to comment on history and geopolitical issues in the past, and he bounced off the system, my Mother for sure does not understand how to comment, maybe our new self made system will work and allow the other 90 percent to play. Mom, give it a try, I think you can make comments now.

Mubende, Uganda
East Africa
Saturday, May 2, 2009


What Breed of Cattle is this Gary?

Explain this cow or cattle Gary, also, what is the difference between the words “Cows” and “Cattle?”

I think this is the Bantu Breed, however in a PC correct world she is maybe Ganda, Nyankole, Kiga, Soga, Iteso, Langi, or Acholi. When I ask people what language they speak in Uganda, they say Ugandan. Ethnic groups are normally called by the language more than the tribe; there are some true problems with word when defining culture, the very culture being defined does not know their label.

Ok, Gary, I know you like a challenge, what are the cultural or motivational reasons for allowing these cattle to have horns?

Note, most cows on planet earth have their horns removed for many reasons.

Gary, I gave you a couple of side views, this should help.

Gary went to Purdue, I went to Indiana University Bloomington, I have always felt sorry for them boys at Purdue, it always seemed to me that women who went to Purdue were the stragglers, maybe runts is the correct word, there is something Darwinian going on… hehehe

Uganda Cattle Photos


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Maybe you should replace Read comments with Click here to read or write comments.

Horia, from Bucharest

seems pretty easy to put in a comment from your web site link to your daily log. click on comment below the daily entry and fill in the form.

Hi Andy

cattle are born to have horns. They get removed for not hurting the others when growning up in bulks.

Holsteiner withsmall remaining horn (no well done job) see here

I love your pics from this long horns.

Andy, Those animals look like they should be our Ft Wayne zoo. All the farmers and Amish people would give the zoo more business than they could handle all summer, just to get a look at these really strange cows with the weird faces and huge odd shaped horns. They are nothing like the few longhorned cattle we see a few of around here. Good thing to have in this recession to give the zoo a boost. Mom

Hi Andy,
Good to see your mom was able to comment.
Nice pictures.
Keep up the good work.
Jack and Jane

Cattle is cows is cattle

Wiki is loaded with info, sometimes true

There are a few people up our way (New Hampshire) that are raising these:

They are tough and handle the winters well. There was one nearby that my girlfriend really liked and she named it Snuffles. As in Snuffleupagus.

Bob L


You know that cattle implies bovines without implying the sex, while cows implies females females, or, most precisely, females that have had two or more calves.

I suspect that the horns are left on for several reasons. Taking them off easily requires the use of either electrical units or, I think, an acid, and must be done when small. Later, would require massive cutting, and both would leave a hole in the head that must be medicated. Also, in some cultures, such as on Jersey Island, the cows were lead by a locket or rope around their horns.

As for the breeds, I am not familiar with breeds that produce such massive horns. The black and white on the one indictates that it may have some Holsteing-Friesian in it, though far from pure.

Wow, Ive never seen anything like this before in my life, when they get angry, if they get angry what happens to the person standing close the them?

Absolutely amazing long horned cattle. Bring those bad boys back to the state of Texas and see if they would be considered long horns. Now that would be an interesting cross breed!

arent those zebu cattle?

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