Malaria Medicine in Kenya Africa

Malaria Medicine in Kenya Africa
I have a fat nodule pushing against my sciatic nerve, the pain is difficult to ignore. Therefore, I have a habit of stopping in Pharmacies and asking question, hoping to have some insight revealed.

The other day I walked into a Pharmacy here in Kilgoris, Kenya and was surprised to see Quinine medicine used for Malaria on the shelf.

Kilgoris, Kenya
East Africa
Saturday, April 18, 2009


The yellow boxes on the left are Quinine, the Doctor says for treatment of Malaria. The white boxes on the right with a drawing of a Mosquito are to help children to resist Malaria.

I was alarmed to see these medicines in great quantities, stacked up and in a very prominent location in the Pharmacy. This worries me, generally when there is some obvious precaution or solution, there is also the obvious problem.

For example, if you have bars on your Hotel room windows there is generally a problem with thieves and robbers, a person should not listen to locals telling you how safe it is, they have the bars there for a reason.

This is Doctor Ralph Muskoka who runs or works in the Altopok Pharmacy here in Kilgoris, Kenya. He told me he studied in the USA and was an interesting person to talk with, however his English was difficult.

I am still a little baffled on the Quinine Medicine, I ask my Masai friend and she said this medicine is not being used; they are using the more modern medicines for Malaria, not the Quinine.

I read that Ashton Kutcher, some actor I do not know was going to donate 10,000 Mosquito Nets to help fight Malaria, something do with an anti-malaria week. He got one million followers on

This is a mistake, he should be donating the money to have screens put on 10,000 houses, the solution to Malaria is not Mosquito Nets, the locals generally refuse to use them. Plus the design of the mosquito nets still allows mosquitoes to enter the net; the soaked in repellent concept is more or less a make money idea.

The solution to Malaria is to have screens installed on windows, and induce the manufactures of windows in have screens included, the world is just too stupid some days. I am in a Hotel here in Kilgoris, Kenya, the windows are very modern, yet because the national window manufacturing standards are low, they do not have screens as a standard part of the window. It is not the custom; people do not expect them, nothing to do with cost. I normally close all the windows and doors about 1-2 hours before sunset and I do not need to use the mosquito net. I am at about 2000 meters above sea level; it is not hot at night.

This is worm medicine; there was a whole shelf of this medicine and again in a prominent position. It is alarming to see this much medicine in one location, even though Kenya is very modern in many ways, there is some gaps in their systems that allows problems to exist that should not exist.

Generally in Africa, they still have not learned how to wash dishes or clean their hands, they believe that washing off the dishes in cold water eradicated problems, while the dishes are still wet and carrying problems from one person to the next because they are not dried or stored properly. Hot water is needed to wash dishes, it is truly a wonder of modern man, and to be able to have hot water come directly from the tap is the healthiest of all modern conveniences.

Life is Good

Malaria Medicine in Kenya Africa


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a little story about malaria medicine or prevention. which is a lie since there are a million strains of malaria. however, the story goes like this. i took off for my indefinite travel trip and was warned by a million of people since im going to the tropics to take malaria pills. i did, for 8 months or so. casue back then the hype was to take, not to care. anyhow, i was in my late 20s, a vegan, a fitness instructor and by all means fat. all of a sudden, in guatemala, i was told that my gallbladder was super infected adn full of sandy grainy like stones. and i had to get it taken out. total suprise to me. considering that i didnt even know what a gallbladder was good for at that time.

regardless, i had it taken out and all the while i did research as to what the hell went wrong. it turns out, some of the side effects for malaria pills is the slow destruction of your gall bladder.

so my advice to everyone. dont take malaria pills as prevention. wait til you really need it!!!!!!
The Travel Expert(a) and an Expat with a Twist

11 years and I have never used the malaria medicine.

but why fix a problem that makes the drug companies a fortune?
however I think it would be hard to put screens in mud huts.. where most of the problem exists.
We should be teaching ounce of prevention is worth a pound of cure.

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