How do People Suffer in Ghana and the USA

I have many people in Ghana say,
"Help us, we suffer."

I am jaded, and aware that this comment can mean two things:

1. Give me money.
2. Feel sorry for me and help me.



In the USA, they will say the same thing in a different way,
"I am too busy."

The malady of the planet is the enabling of dysfunctional comments.

I have a three-step program for myself:

1. Shut up.
2. Listen up.
3. Grow up.

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Ho, Ghana West Africa --- Wednesday, December 22, 2010




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I had a couple days of feeling sorry for myself, fortunately it must pass here in Africa fast, because there is nobody here who gives a shit. The last thing a person from Ghana does is feel sorry or help an American, I am just shit out of luck.



How do people suffer in Ghana?

1. Waiting for the whites to return.
2. Waiting for the whites to save them.
3. The blacks outside of Ghana refusing to help or invest in Ghana.
4. The Ghana rich people refusing to invest in their own country.
5. The minute a Ghana person has money, they move to another country.
6. Becoming educated for a job where there is zero demand.
7. The belief that sports is a solution.
8. The belief that Ghana is poor, it is a rich country.
9. Asking for help, this affirms their belief they cannot help themselves.
10. Being surrounded by 51 countries that believe the same.

I have the rewarding experience yesterday of talking with a truly wise and understanding old woman. She reminded me of my Grandmother Fleck, she is now dead, but I remember a weak and terrible day of my life that I shared with my Grandmother. I came home from Jail; I was arrested the night before for drunken driving, and had spent the night in a fog. It was my third or fourth DWI; I do not care to remember. I do remember that it was the two strike law in Indiana, which means after the second one, you go to jail for two years.

I told my Grandmother of my sad news, she listened, she consoled me, and she said,
"We need to eat breakfast now."

My Grandmother was part of what could be called a great generation:
"The Greatest Generation" is a term coined by journalist Tom Brokaw to describe the generation who grew up in the United States during the deprivation of the Great Depression, and then went on to fight in World War II.
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Greatest_Generation

I was an alcoholic, a true bunch of losers. Nobody feels sorry for drunks, and rightly, so, they should not, they are losers.

My Grandmother gave me startling lesson that morning in Indiana.

She did not say:
1. Shut up.
2. Listen up.
3. Grow up.

She went into action, she got on with life and stopped focusing on the problem, she never lost stride, she stayed the course, and she suddenly became part of the solution.

I sat there eating breakfast wishing she would feel sorry for me, while she gave me another cup of coffee.

Now, for all you abusive shits who are going to jump on me admitting I had problems, get a life, your comments will just be deleted. It is sick person who wants to kick anyone or make fun of people who is or was down; you just ignore bad as best you can. I always think of the Brits, when I am listening to an American say,
"I am too busy."
If I reply, agree, or give it credence.
"It is bad form."

Merry Christmas, the world has so much to be grateful for, it is amazing they can find so many problems to complain about.

I felt sorry for myself because I have too much time, and I am bored, I need a good book, I am going to Accra to buy a book, or I could say, we need to eat breakfast now.

Now focus, please focus, do not get a sense of self-righteous importance because I told you a story of my shame. You are not better than me, I am not better than you, but I am on an endless vacation, what have you done today? Did you tell someone,
"I am too busy?"

How do People Suffer in Ghana and the USA

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