HoboTraveler.com is Finished with Lome, Togo 2010

I am starting to return towards Ivory Coast using a round about path.

I have been wandering around in Togo visiting friends, entering from Aflao, Ghana to Lome, Togo and then went north to Cinkasse to visit a friend. Returned to Atakpame, thinking I would go over to Kpalime and cross into Ghana. Then realized a group of "Internationals" was going to have their normal Thursday dinner group, so I decided to stop in Lome to attend.

As you can see, I have been roaming freely around West Africa, the speed was allowed because I have multiple entry visas to Ghana and Togo, which I got in Abidjan, Cote d’Ivoire.

Lome, Togo West Africa --- Friday, November 26, 2010


Internationals Dinner in Lome
I almost had to attend; the dinner was at the "Koh Samui" Sushi Restaurant, just the name on the outside of the Restaurant made me laugh. The food was good, there was air conditioning and this is always a treat in West Africa, and the menu made me want to scream

I have taken to saying or screaming California when words are used in a pretentious and superfluous way just to let people listening know they know the word. Maybe the "Slang du Jour," is a way of viewing this travel game called "California."

The menu offered a "Nem," I was confused, asked the German guy next to me, and he told me it was a Chinese Spring Roll.

- A Restaurant named "Koh Samui" after the Island in Thailand.
- Serving Sushi as the main food, which is Japanese, as I understand.
- With a menu that was for the most part Chinese, and not Thai.

I was in a very good Asian food restaurant with many words being used in "Californian" way, I had to attend, it was obligatory for a person who has been to Thailand or Asia many times. Please note, I am not brave enough to eat Sushi in West Africa for any reason, however the food was excellent in an over-priced, three dollar a cup of coffee way, which is typical in Lome, all the restaurants take pride in trying to price in a Frenchie way.

I ate this Cashew Rice something, had to ask for Pepper, but life was good, cost me 20 bucks or three time the cost of my room.

International Expat People
There was nobody at the group that was the same as three years ago when I attend, it now has a German, Danish, French feel about the group, I was the only American and the language we spoke was English. I spent my time talking with a truly nice French woman who works for the UNV, the United Nations Volunteers; she was married to a Hausa man from Niger.

I was somewhat astounded; she is the first foreigner to ever say to have eaten at a "Cafeteria" here in Lome, the cheap and local diners of this country. I was explaining where and how I ate "Lait Caille."

The group is generally a country club set, never leave the resort, drive your own car types. If you watch the movie "The World of Susie Wong." you would understand the type of Expats in West Africa.
The World of Susie Wong

White people in West Africa are always in their own car or have a driver; seldom do you see a person in public transport unless it is the volunteer to suffer "Peace Corps" kids.

Kpalime or Atakpame
It is 5:34 am on Friday, I have yet to make up my mind, maybe I go to Kpalime or back to Atakpame, and I want to get back out-of-touch with foreigners. I am leaning towards Atakpame for a very beautiful reason, but Kpalime is closer to the Ghana Border. When the Election in Cote d’Ivoire is finished, I will return to continue on into Liberia.

I have been thinking, I could count the days between talking English, I went about 45 days in Cote d’Ivoire, this means I did not talk with an Expat foreigners for over 45 days, and this is a long time.

I am going to splurge today, I am going to heat up a bucket of water and take a hot dip bath, I am tired of the cold channel.

HoboTraveler.com is Finished with Lome, Togo 2010


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Excellent post today describing how most foreigners / citizens of wealthy countries live while supposedly being "selfless" enough to "help" the impoverished masses around the world. Generally speaking I find them hypocritical and their conspicuous consumption sickens me. In 2005 while in Sumatra a year after the Tsunami devastated the local communities all the NGO personel were riding around in U$30,000 to U$40,000 SUVs the cost of each of which would finance the replacement, building of 6 or more local houses. Many of these "expat" NGOs make U$40,000 to U$80,000 / year in countries where the average annual income is U$1000 to U$3000 / year. Ok Andy, Keep on truckin and enjoying life's many experiences, "on the road".

Ahh the simple joys of living, a hot shower, I know what you mean.

Good to see you moving a little fast. It is good to intermix bouts of slow travel with fast. More exciting to read too.

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