Wood

West Africa Logging

West Africa Logging
Kpalime, Togo West Africa
Monday, April 2, 2007

I came upon an article of interest on the BBC about loggers in Peru and their fight with small groups of indigenous people.
http://news.bbc.co.uk/1/hi/world/americas/6513117.stm

I tend to believe BBC makes up a heartfelt topic, impossible to disprove and creates a way for the NGO to advertise for people to donate or send money to the for profit world of Non Governmental Organizations.

A Christian Catholic Priest stopped me in the streets yesterday, I say, I have no money and I do not give to people. I do not even need to listen, I know the story. I listen to check him, then brush him off, saying, go talk to the USA Peace Corps persons, they are naïve.

There is always an essence of truth, maybe 1 percent, and this is real. The truth is, here in Africa, I think they have already logged all the best trees and they are finished. Peru or the Amazon basin is more primitive than West Africa and the territory is much more difficult to log, therefore more expensive and take better equipment.

West Africa is more or less flat, the highest mountain or small hill in Togo is something like 1000 meters high, not even a foothill in Nepal, and in Peru, a baby.

West Africa was easy and the Germans, Dutch and seem to have taken all the good trees.

Peru is mountainous, and the Amazon is on the other side of the Andes and difficult to reach for the loggers.

The rain forest does grow back, but not big, somewhat smaller and brush like; I am hard pressed to believe the oxygen being made is not close or the same as the big trees.

I am worried about the world turning the planet into a rice paddy lake. The amount of water surface being created on the planet is crazy; they need to grow rice without being in water.

The burning of Africa is a problem, bigger than AID, or SIDA or whatever the NGO-ONG’s think is sellable to the naïve public. Africa is the poster child on the side of a Milk Box. A great way to raise cash from good people and do nothing.

28 percent of Ghana is farmed and 46 percent of Togo is farmed according to my Encarta Encyclopedia. I see about 95 percent of the land as being open or possible to be farmed. The loggers have cleared the land, then the West Africa people farm around the scrag, they are the worst farmers on the planet, but they do not need to do well; there is an overabundance of farmland, food is easy to grow.

Now, Togo talks about Environment, I want to see where they are re-planting the trees.

Stop. I have promised myself I will ignore the NGO-ONG of the planet, the worthless bunch of users.

My guess is Togo and Ghana farm about 15 percent of the available farmland. This is not to say, there is just an empty field, it is land that has been cleared of the big trees and brush and junk trees and plant are everywhere. It need finished and made read for large scale farming and if not, replanted to trees, but more just sits and the people use to hunt for firewood to cook.

West Africa Logging




Togo Teak Mahogany

Togo Teak Mahogany
Kametonou Togo West Africa
April 2007

What is this wood, there is no way to be sure, except to ask an expert, and then try to hope the expert is an expert.

This is a photo of wood along side the road that leads up the small village at the Togo - Ghana Border. I am on the Togo side in the small village of Kametonou Togo West Africa



There were regular, maybe 2 x 14 inch rough-cut planks, and then this rectangular block cut style wood chunks. Michael offered a couple of names for them, I semi-refused the answers as I had already said the word Mahogany before he used the word.

Learning is so incredibly frustrating; it takes the 99 percent frustration and the one-person inspiration to learn accurately. I get a hint on something, and then I need to follow up on the hints.

I can give many examples of data or information that is inherently troublesome and fraught with problems.

Example:
The ethnic groups is maybe Ewe and the language is Mina, however if you ask a person what group they are part of, I have never hear them say Ewe, I hear them say Mina. Therefore if most or the extreme majority of people say they are Mina, can we call them Ewe.

Large amounts of Teak, Mahogany and other valuable woods were harvested and taken out of Africa; therefore, there is the perception that these forests have these trees. However, if they did a very good job, then what are left may be other varieties of trees. I made the mistake of asking Michael,
- Are these mahogany trees? -

He then says later, when he fully understood my question and said,
- Mahogany.-

His first answer was something in Mina, and like Oawa. The truth is, Michaels sells clothing to women, and he may know some information about the clothing industry. I need to find the proverbial horse’s mouth to find the truth and everyone knows the answers, however I am 99 percent sure, and they do not.

I read, maybe that Teak and Mahogany grow here, my map, the one I purchased in Kpalime has small symbols that indicated that teak is grown in those areas.

Everyone is an expert on everything on the planet, and I am positive there are very few experts on issues.

In this village, I counted 8 large piles of wood, about 5 x 5 x 20 Foot in size, this is a large amount of wood in a village where all the home are made of clay adobe or concrete. It does appear they was harvesting the wood. The lumber people of Africa seem to have came and took what was easy to find and cut.

Togo Teak Mahogany





Togo Teak Lumber

Togo Teak Lumber
Akloa Water Falls Badou Africa
May 2007

Maybe this is Teak, maybe it is not, I was thinking, how normal in the world, I pay a fee to go see the Waterfalls or Cascade d Akloa near the small village of Badou in Western Middle Togo and what do I see. The locals cutting down the Jungle, I came to see. The girl I was with called this - Ati or Atee -

Africa is falling…
Timber!



Cascade de Alkoa, Togo



Men with chainsaws cutting into planks, at the Cascade de Alkoa, Togo.



Cascade de Alkoa, Togo



Cascade de Alkoa, Togo, the in focus and out of focus of Photography.



This is the wood grain of the wood, I asked many time, what is this, and one says a Planche... Cascade de Alkoa, Togo



Hmmm... This is not a secret project, just normal work, I am not sure what. Near the village of Badou, Togo in the West of Togo and middle.

Lumber, Wood, Nature, Trees, Togo Economics, Togo,

Togo Teak Lumber