Street Food

Wagassi Togo Street Food

Wagassi Togo Street Food
Wagassi Wagashe Wagasee
Badou Togo West Africa
Thursday, May 3, 2007

One man wrote it down as Wagassi from the Kotokoli language, but what does he know, he only speaks the language.

Street Food of Badou, Togo West Africa

I have considered trying to think of guidelines and a tip on how to eat safely anywhere on the planet. I believe the safest way to eat food is packaged or processed foods, like crackers in a package and any food on a shelf in a container of some type, I now check the expiration dates, and I go in stores that are selling a lot of food, eggs make me nervous.

Then second is to cook the food yourself.
Third is Street Food
Fourth is a busy food stand.

I think the more expensive the restaurant maybe the more dangerous the food. Numbers, what I feel I need, I need numbers, I count the people, how many people are eating the food. Here in Togo if I go into an expensive Tourist fare restaurant, I am probably the only person in the restaurant. This make me extremely nervous, unless a busy Tourist Fare restaurant with lots of tourist.

Busy is good, slow is bad. More food tester, maybe we all die.

Now, when the food comes out from a Tourist Fare Restaurant, it looks good, and it may be good, but how do I know how long that chicken was there in the kitchen, and when they cooked it. They may have cooked the chicken five days ago, it could have been sitting in a basket, on a shelf, and now they think, we will sell it or we lose money, so let us heat it up and sell it. They are happy to sell the left-over food, because why would they lose money to be safe.

I have traveled for 10 years, I see this all the time, every day of the week, the food that was not sold yesterday, is served the next day. I took a photo of cooked chicken in Thailand at 7:00 in the morning, this is normal, not abnormal, and do would you trust a leader in Africa, and you trust the cook.

Street food, I like street food, I can see them make it, I cannot see goulash, or sauces, or complicated foods being made, but if I can see many people eating it, if the place is busy, I know, there is a good chance this food is fresh, because it will soon be gone.

This is a very happy and fun lady just as I clear the parking lot of the Cascades Plus Hotel here in Badou, Togo. She is selling as best I learn and surmise, cooked cheese.

One piece is 25 Franks and 10 would be 250 Francs or
50 Cents US. How much does cooked cheese cost in a restaurant in the USA?

I had an opportunity to eat this at a stop along the road when coming from Atakpame to Badou, however, I could not see them cooking it. Plus not much fun to watch all the locals squeezing the cheese as the reached from inside the van, then grabbing many pieces, squeeze food and put back on the plate, normal for them, touch the food, not normal of me. Why are you touching the food, have you no manners, oops, I am in Africa, this is about what maybe 147 down on the Human Development scale, they did not get that far down the list by being developed, they are under developed.

This is Wagassi, I would say there is maybe no correct way to spell and if there is, then so what. I trust the man today who offered to write the name down for me, then demanded a Cadeau for the service, I ended up giving him my pen, what a pain sometimes to talk with people, everything has a price on it.

I like this food, great to eat, the fat lady was fun, and the man who wrote the word down was ok, in a twisted, you have to love them sort of way.

He says the language is,

Never heard of this, and not sure where it came from, not sure I care, it I cared about what I seen everyday, I would need to go home and relax after one day of travel. The world is endless, there is more than I can every learn, but great for a curious sort like me, and I do get hungry.

Food, Togo Food, Street Food, Togo,

Wagassi Wagashe Wagasee
Wagassi Togo Street Food

Togo Beignet

Togo Beignet
Badou Togo West Africa

This is Togo Street food, found in Badou, Togo and other places I forget already.

Beignet d Haricot Piment Sel

One man says, or wrote this, it is a bread type of food, deep fried, and with an African type of pepper inside and salt. The pepper really is a good extra kick, I learned to like them before I knew they were made with Beans, Haricot in French is beans. If you would have said beans, I would have refused.

Literally this is

Fried Bread of Bean Pepper Salt

It is a little frustrating and sensitive to me, the Togo or West Africa diet has so many calories packed into every food. Pate, Fufu, Yams, Cassava, etc, then they put oil on the top of many things. This is an over packed country, the people are fat, there is no easy way to say if nourishment is correct, however if there is fruits around they eat better.

This is a lady in Badou, Togo, does not seem to understand French, is grumpy, and I am a regular customer. The way to buy food in Togo is often to just to give them money. Give here say 100 CFA or Franc and she gives you a bag with some amount you will learn the price after the fact.

My most cultural experiences and the best, I am have about a 1 in 50 chance of understanding what happened. I am slowly, it has taken 10 year of practice, but slowly I have learned how to understand a culture fast. This food as explained by one man, maybe the information is correct, maybe it is not, learning about food and culture is a process, not an event. I like the pepper taste of this bread like food.

I eat what is tempting to me, not what someone tell me is good. I do not like the Pate or the Fufu, therefore, I do not want to learn about it. I want to learn about what I enjoy.

The food of Togo is difficult, either I am in restaurant that is twice as expensive as the USA, and the same as France and the food is terrible or I am in the streets. There is very little middle ground, I like the street food 100 times more than feeling like a victim to an overpriced Tourist menu with bad food.

This lady prepared these perfect, strangely I had one on a moto trip to the Ghana border, and had to throw them away.

I have discovered by in Atakpame, it is rare and difficult to find the cooked cheese called Wagassi, I am sad or hungry or both.

Food, Togo Food, Street Food, West Africa Food, Togo, Togo Budget,

Togo Beignet

Mesonges du Tchoukoutou

Mesonges du Tchoukoutou
Atakpame, Togo West Africa
Tuesday, May 8, 2007

Sunday it the day for Tchoukoutou in Atakpame, Togo

Tchoukoutou is some type of corn mash beer, and Sunday is the day to partake.

This girl went to visit her parents and drank some Tchoukoutou, then proceeds to tell me she only drain half a bowl. I said, Tchoukoutou Mesonges, however she corrected my French and said, Mesonges du Tchoukoutou

More or less the lies of the home brew. She says she speaks Kabiye.

Sobabi is the high powered brew or distilled drink they make, I have started noticing signs on building saying Sobabi. More or less come buy moonshine here.

Beer, Drinks, Food, Street Food, Togo Food, Togo

Mesonges du Tchoukoutou

Togo Food Biscuit Kolonto

Togo Food Biscuit Kolonto
Lome, Togo West Africa
Monday, June 11, 2007

25 CFA or about 5 Cents US per biscuit

The name for this food in the local language Ewe language of Lome, Togo is Kolonto, pronounced as you would pronounced French. Koh Lone Toh.

Interestingly the persons selling this corrected me when I said Ewe and they said Eva language.

This food is maybe made from wheat flour, however I have never seen wheat in Togo, maybe of corn or millet, hard to know. This food is more or less flours with water made into patties and baked, I think they add some licorice flavor or something, just a tinge. This is hard and stays fresh or ok to eat for days in these containers.

Lots of calories for a few cents.

Collecting information on language, culture, foods is like chasing rainbows, just when you think you are close it is further away. I read information written with too much force or authority, I do not want to portray confidence in this information. I am often very confused and it can take years to unravel the truth.

Who to trust, the educated people try to hide information and the one with no education cannot read or write. These simple street foods are often ignored as low class foods and not worthy to mention. This is a common food, easy to buy in Lome, Togo as you would walk around in neighborhoods, however, I do not see many Yebo walking around in neighborhoods.

In the USA or Indiana we say supper, this is a word in Indiana, a person teaching English should not avoid the real word, or the person traveling to Indiana will be surprised.

This is a normal food of Togo, normal is normal and special is special, culture is all things of a culture, not just special.

I read often about special foods of a country, I go to the country and never even see the food, I semi-believe what is obvious is the culture, and what is not obvious is history.

Togo Food, Food, Togo, Street Food,

Togo Food Biscuit Kolonto

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